Muse

Nature is a great muse for art. Nature is a great muse for science. In many ways science and art can also draw inspiration from each other. This series shows us that science in its various forms mimic so much of nature -from colors to patterns to feelings.

Purple.

Figure 14. Tribute to science and flowers. Haematoxylin and eosin staining of mouse brain cerebellum. There are three layers in a cerebellum; the white matter, granule cell and molecular layer. Images viewed with Leica DM1 AF6000B.

Muse 1.0

Figure 15. Tribute to science and flowers. The science behind love can be explained by a lot of neurotransmitters and the feelings associated with these chemicals. One example is the neurotransmitter serotonin. Serotonin also known as the ‘happy chemical’ is a neurotransmitter known for the role it plays in feelings of attraction, well-being, and happiness. In this picture, nerve fibers were stained with a red fluorescent labeled protein to match perfectly with the rose.

Muse 2.0

Figure 16. Tribute to science and flowers. Purkinje cells are a class of neurons which release a neurotransmitter called GABA which makes it an inhibitory interneuron. Inhibitory interneurons slow down or stops the transmission of nerve impulses. Purkinje cells are seen in this photo as green large dots.

Muse 3.0

Figure 17. Tribute to science and flowers. Haematoxylin and eosin staining of mouse brain cerebellum. There are three layers in a cerebellum; the white matter, granule cell and molecular layer. Images viewed with Leica DM1 AF6000B.

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